Transport for London has asked the Government to help fund a second entrance for Surrey Quays Station and extra facilities at Canada Water Bus Station to meet rising demand for public transport as the area is developed.

News of the funding bid came in London transport commissioner Mike Brown’s regular report to the TfL board.

“We submitted a bid to the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF) on 3 December for various enhancements to the transport network to support the provision of around 14,000 new homes by 2031,” wrote Mr Brown.

“The enhancements included in the bid were as follows:

  • An increase in service frequencies on the East London line to 20 trains per hour
  • A second entrance at Surrey Quays station
  • A new station at Surrey Canal Road, between Queens Road Peckham and Surrey Quays
  • Additional facilities at Canada Water bus station, to enable the provision of a new bus route serving the Convoys Wharf development

“These enhancements will support the major developments proposed at Canada Water, New Bermondsey and Convoys Wharf, delivering mixed-use development that supports key Mayoral objectives.

“A decision on funding for the bid is expected from central government during 2019. “

Last summer TfL set out its initial view on the transport implications of the Canada Water masterplan.

Proposals to rebuild Rotherhithe Primary School with expanded premises for an extra form of entry are now being considered by the council’s planning department.

The existing buildings date from 1971 and are said to be beyond viable refurbishment.

The new school – facing Hawkstone Road – has been designed by Fielden Clegg Bradley Studios.

The architects say they have drawn on the area’s history when developing their vision for the new school:

The ribbon of the garden wall wraps around the site creating a protected central courtyard evocative of the historic basins and dry docks which were once carved out of the Rotherhithe peninsular. The organic shapes and materials of the landscape flow into the ‘basin’ of the courtyard which is framed by the more rectilinear walls of the building, inspired by the retaining walls of the dry docks and Brunel’s engineering legacy.

See planning application 18/AP/3792 for further details.

New plans to demolish the long-closed Albion pub at the corner of Albion Street and Neptune Street – and replace it with a four-storey block of flats  – have been submitted to Southwark Council.

The Albion pictured before closure
The latest proposals

A planning application for the redevelopment of the pub was submitted in spring 2017 but was withdrawn before a decision was made.

Now revised plans have been submitted to the council under reference 18/AP/3984 by George Macari of the Albion Pub Co.

In 2016, Southwark planners had advised that “the existing building carries certain architectural qualities that offer visual interest to Albion Street therefore the building is considered a non-designated heritage asset”.

Justifying their proposal to demolish the pub, Michael Trentham Architects argue that “the Neo Tudor style is a pastiche design and out of keeping with the overall character of the area”.

“The current public house was built in 1928 and is a typical plain example of the interwar Neo-Tudor public house design that was very common. It lacks the simple integrity of the surrounding buildings.”

Canada Water

Southwark’s cabinet this week approved the Canada Water Regeneration Charter, the first in a series of document setting out how the council will work with partners on measures to improve residents’ health and economic wellbeing in parallel with the major physical development schemes. 

“It is important when regeneration and change comes to our borough that key strategic partners are aligned with the priorities of the council and the community, and setting their sights high in realising a wide range of tangible benefits for existing communities,” sais Cllr Leo Pollak, cabinet Member for social regeneration, Great Estates and new homes.

“The Canada Water Social Regeneration Charter, developed with British Land, presents the results of a series of intensive consultation exercises reaching thousands of local people, and identifies a number of emerging priorities for the redevelopment – among them supporting new enterprise and skills development initiatives, creating new opportunities for young people, and spreading the benefits of new investment to neighbouring estates.”

You can watch the cabinet discussion on this page, and all the documents are available on the council website.

British Land says that occupiers from “a range of sectors” are showing interest in moving to the firm’s massive Canada Water development. Building work could start in the second half of 2019 once planning permission is granted.

The developer’s half-year results – published on Wednesday – included a lengthy section on Canada Water which is reproduced below.

Canada Water: A unique redevelopment opportunity in London

Highlights
• 5m sq ft mixed use development scheme
• Master development agreement signed with Southwark Council in May 2018
• Planning application including detailed planning submission on the first three buildings and outline
planning for the whole scheme submitted May 2018
• Valuation up 0.3% to £293m

At Canada Water, we are working with the London Borough of Southwark to deliver a 5m sq ft mixed use scheme,
including 3,000 new homes alongside a mix of commercial, retail and community space. The site benefits from
excellent transport connectivity with Canary Wharf and the West End two and twelve minutes respectively on the
Jubilee line and Shoreditch just ten minutes away by Overground. It covers 53 acres including the dock area,
providing 48 acres of developable land.

We started engaging on our masterplan proposals in 2014 and since then have held over 120 public consultation
and local outreach events. These have attracted over 11,000 people who provided 12,000 comments on our
plans, enabling us to shape a design with strong local appeal. Together with Southwark Council, we have now
committed to a Social Regeneration Charter which will ensure that residents in the borough benefit from the
development.
In May, we submitted our planning application, which included a detailed application on the project’s first three
buildings together covering nearly 580,000 sq ft. Our plans include 265 homes of which 35% will be affordable.
Building A1 will provide both residential and workspace and building A2 will be focused on workspace and a new
leisure centre, with both providing a small amount of retail at ground floor. K1, the third building will be wholly
residential. These buildings are part of a major first phase covering 1.9m sq ft of mixed use space.

The development agreement which we signed in May 2018 sets out the terms of a new headlease, which
consolidates our holdings into a single 500 year headlease with Southwark Council as the Lessor. This structure
effectively aligns the ownership of these assets, with British Land owning 80% and Southwark Council owning
the remaining 20%. Southwark Council will have the opportunity to participate in the development of the
individual plots, up to a maximum of 20% and returns will be pro-rated accordingly. This headlease becomes
effective on the fulfilment of a number of conditions, most importantly achieving outline planning consent for the
whole masterplan and detailed planning consent for the first three buildings.

Subject to planning approvals, construction of the first detailed plots could begin in the second half of 2019.

Potential funding structures will be explored when we have greater visibility on timing, ahead of which, we are
already seeing interest in the space from a range of sectors and discussions are underway on several buildings.

In the meantime, the Printworks has become an established live and electronic music venue, frequently hosting
crowds of up to 5,000. Ticket sales and visitors are now up to 300,000 with 31 shows scheduled for the Autumn
season.

The valuation of Canada Water increased to £293m benefitting from progress made with our planning application
although we continue to incur feasibility costs in relation to the Masterplan.

British Land has reduced the height of the tallest towers proposed as part of its Canada Water masterplan.

The changes follow criticism from Historic England which warned this summer that “the 162m tower in Plot D would block the silhouette of Tower Bridge’s south bastion in kinetic views along London Bridge, visually competing with its monumental character and reducing its landmark status along the Thames”.

Under the latest plans – submitted to Southwark Council this week – the tallest element of the scheme has been reduced from 162m to 138m, with two other proposed towers also reduced in height.

Roger Madelin, Head of Canada Water Development at British Land, said: “The Canada Water Masterplan is a unique opportunity to deliver a genuinely mixed new urban centre in a unique part of London. It’s essential that we get this right, and we are pleased to be submitting our revised plans to Southwark Council.

“This is an exciting regeneration project for which there is a lot of enthusiasm locally, but we remain committed to listening to the community and responding to concerns. Over the past few months, we have been in a constructive dialogue with Southwark Council and the local community to improve our plans.

We are proud to be submitting an updated application for a project which is just as ambitious, but better responds to feedback that has been received from the local community and others.”

Other changes include alterations to the massing of the proposed office and leisure centre building, and revisions to the housing mix. 

See the full details of the revisions by viewing the documents at planning application 18/AP/1904


Councillors will decide next Tuesday whether or not to grant planning permission for the controversial ‘Alice in Winterland‘ commercial event due to take over part of Southwark Park from November to January.

The scheme is on the agenda for planning sub-committee B on Tuesday 30 October.

In his report to the committee, planning officer Alex Cameron concludes: “Overall, given the temporary nature of the proposal, it is not considered that it would affect the long term openness of Southwark Park and would provide facilities for outdoor recreation. While the development is not strictly an appropriate one on [Metropolitan Open Land], it is acceptable  considering it would be temporary and the benefits to the local community.”

Nearly 500 people have signed a petition opposing the event, but others – including the Friends of Southwark Park – are supportive. 

Full details of the planning application are at 18/AP/2766.