Plans to light up some of Rotherhithe’s landmark buildings to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower in 2020 have moved a step closer.

More than £30,000 has been raised to allow a feasibility study to be undertaken. £20,000 has been contributed by the Greater London Authority with the balance coming from local people, businesses and organisations.

WE HIT OUR TARGET TODAY – 3 DAYS BEFORE MONDAY’S DEADLINE – AND WE’VE EXCEEDED IT!  We never believed for a moment that it would be possible to raise such a significant sum in such a relatively short space of time, but thanks to YOU and all the other 176 generous pledgers we have actually managed to achieve our goal.  
 
We are now in overfunding mode!  This is a wonderful – and very unexpected – position to be in.  It will still be possible to make a pledge for the next couple of weeks, and as stated on our Spacehive project page all the additional funds will be held in reserve to put towards the cost of the installation of the lighting scheme later on, after the technical feasibility study has been completed.  

It’s been suggested that there is potentially funding available in another mayoral funding pot to cover part of the cost of the installation, and last week I was given a promise of corporate financial support for the installation, which is very exciting! But there is lots more work to do.

We want to move the process forward as quickly as we can now, and we are still hoping that there might be time for this legacy lighting scheme to be installed by July 2020 when the Mayflower 400 celebrations/commemorations begin.  We have already arranged to meet with the conservation architect and the lighting designer in January to discuss next steps.  And if you would like to learn more about the proposed scheme, evening lighting demonstrations will be available for local friends and neighbours – and for anyone else who’s interested – before design development.
 
Please help us by sharing this good news with all your networks and your social media.  
 
THANK YOU AGAIN for your support and for your enthusiasm and for making it possible for us to take our exciting vision forward to the next stage.
 
Festive greetings and very best wishes for 2019.
 
Clare and the Illuminate Rotherhithe! campaign team

Here’s the update that Clare Armstrong – who devised the project – shared with backers on the Spacehive crowdfunding site:

Pupils at Redriff Primary City of London Academy have been taking part in activities to mark 100 years since the end of World War One.

Children from nursery age to Year 6 have been involved in a wide range of activities, building up to the school’s Remembrance Assembly today and finally culminating in the unveiling of the school’s memorial garden.

The memorial garden has a steel solider inscribed with the words ‘Redriff Remembers 1918-2018’ including crosses, placed by the children, bearing the names of the 600 soldiers from Rotherhithe who were killed in the war.

Also featuring in the garden is a silhouette, which has been supplied by the charity Remembered as part of its 2018 Armistice project –There But Not There.

The children have also constructed a poppy made from stones on which they have written the names of each solider.

The poppy will remain as a permanent feature in the school’s playground.

The garden will be completed on Friday during the Remembrance Assembly when the final crosses will be planted.

Mickey Kelly, executive headteacher of Redriff Primary, said:

“This week has been a moving experience for all the students and staff at the school.

“The children have really grasped the importance of Armistice Day and World War One.

“Teachers have held workshops for the children on what life was like in the trenches and the different aspects of the War, from roles animals played to the impact of the War on women’s lives.”

Today’s assembly saw staff and children observe a two-minute silence.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has given a £20,000 boost to plans to light up six historic Rotherhithe buildings with a pledge of City Hall cash to the crowdfunding campaign.

Funding is being sought to examine the technical feasibility of illuminating six historic buildings in time for 2020, the 400th anniversary of the
sailing of the Mayflower from Rotherhithe to the New World.

Now the scheme’s backers have until 17 December to raise the final £8,280

The minimum pledge is £2 and backers will only be charged if the target is reached.

Deputy Mayor for Planning, Regeneration and Skills, Jules Pipe, said: “All Londoners should feel that they are part of the regeneration of their neighbourhoods and crowdfunding is a really effective way of giving people a stake in their part of the city.

“The Mayor’s Crowdfund London programme empowers Londoners to bring about positive change in their local area and I would encourage people to support these innovative projects.”

Swedish Quays – described as “aesthetically challenging” by the Guardian’s architecture critic last year – has been given grade II listed status by the Government.

The complex of 95 homes next to South Dock is one of a number of 1980s buildings to be listed now that they have reached the minimum age – 30 years – for listed status.

From the official listing record:

Swedish Quays of 1986-1990, by David Price and Gordon Cullen, is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

Architectural interest:

* a striking and distinctive Post-Modern composition with precise, multi-layered detailing skilfully executed in good quality materials;

* contextually astute, its monumental scale and use of materials references the former buildings and dock walls of the industrial landscape in which it sits;

Historic interest:

* a successful example of townscape created by Gordon Cullen, Britain’s most influential planning theorist and architectural illustrator of the post-war period.

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The church of St James’s Bermondsey has announced that stonework repairs on the tower will soon begin as scaffolding is erected to the very top.

The works are funded by £232,700 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, together with a contribution of £57,000 from the Parochial Church Council of St James’s. The work is due to be finished by mid September.

The work will include much-needed repair to the tower and portico stonework, to the clock face and bell, and to the golden dragon weather vane.

Two open days will be arranged for members of the public to inspect the work, and  to see the famous Bermondsey dragon at close hand.

This will form part of a continuing programme of increasing and improving public access to this landmark  grade II* listed building at the heart of Bermondsey.

Last year St James’s was added to the Heritage at Risk register.

 

The Government has issued a five-year certificate of immunity which prevents the Printworks (formerly Harmsworth Quays) at Canada Water from gaining listed status.

However, the building’s temporary uses have proved so popular that the building may not be flattened in the forthcoming redevelopment of Canada Water. Listen to this Estates Gazette podcast to find out more.

Donald Hunter – who served as radio officer on three Norwegian merchant ships carrying dangerous cargoes to allied forces – at the memorial outside the Norwegian Church

Three war memorials in Rotherhithe have been given listed status by the Government this week in the run up to Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday.

The three newly listed memorials are:

 

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St James’s Church in Bermondsey has been added to Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ register.

The entry on the register says:

“St James’s church was designed in the neoclassical style by James Savage and completed in 1829. The body of the church is in stock brick while the portico, spire and window dressings are in Bath stone. The plan is rectangular. The aisles were closed off in 1965 for rented income to save the church from closure. The nave roof was recently repaired but the masonry is in poor condition with rusted cramps, cracks and eroded stonework. The church has applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund for a grant to repair the external masonry.”

St James’s – which is a grade II* listed building – recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of its reopening and renewal.