Residents and businesses have until Sunday 22 September to have their say on whether and how parking should be controlled in the streets around the Blue.

The consultation area stretches from the railway line in the north to the City of London Academy in the south, with its western border at St James’s Road.

In its consultation document the council says:

“The council has received a number of requests for parking controls to be introduced in your area as well as a petition from residents south of The Blue.

“Local residents are finding it very hard to park near their homes or to exit and enter their drives which is causing significant stress and inconvenience.

“We have also had reports of businesses finding it hard to park in the area and of commuters taking up space that could be used by visitors.

“Off street parking at The Blue will be managed separately by the housing parking team alongside the Good Growth Fund.

“For the safety and convenience of local residents and businesses, the council would like to know whether you think parking could be improved in your area.”

The council has an online survey which is open until Sunday 22 September

Image by Loz Flowers used under a Creative Commons licence

Southwark Council’s cabinet this week agreed to launch a consultation on the future of South Dock Marina and Boatyard.

Tuesday’s cabinet meeting heard a public question and a deputation from members of the bertholders’ association who aired concerns about future residential development which could generate complaints from residents about noisy activity at the boatyard.

In his foreword to the cabinet report, Cllr Richard Livingstone wrote: “The ideas set out in the report include how the marina could be expanded to better meet the demand for people to live on the marina; how the infrastructure of the area could be improved to meet the needs of berth holders and the broader community; how the space at the boatyard could be developed to both enhance its operation and provide new council homes; and how to give berth holders greater certainty on future fee increases.”

You can watch the cabinet meeting here:

The proposed extension of the Santander Cycles bike hire scheme to SE16 will consist of a mere five new docking stations, the Mayor of London has confirmed.

After hints dropped by Southwark councillors and deputy mayor Heidi Alexander earlier in the summer, City Hall confirmed at the end of August that the bike hire scheme would be extended along the new Cycleway 4 between Tooley Street and Canada Water Station.

Now, in response to a question tabled by Lib Dem London Assembly member Caroline Pidgeon, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has given more details.

“It is planned that 5 docking stations (approximately 125 docking points) will be constructed along Cycleway 4 as part of the infrastructure build of that route,” said Sadiq Khan.

“Dates for installation have yet to be agreed with Southwark and are subject to agreeing specific locations with the borough and obtaining planning consents. Conversations on this are ongoing.

“The stations will be funded by Transport for London as part of the Healthy Streets funding portfolio.”

Santander Cycles currently has more than 750 docking stations across Central London.

Although many will welcome the arrival of Santander Cycles in SE16 for the first time, the limited scale of the expansion is likely to come as a disappointment.

Southwark Labour’s 2014 manifesto included a pledge to “work with the Mayor to extend Bike Hire across the borough”.

London’s deputy mayor for transport Heidi Alexander has confirmed that plans are in hand to extend the Santander Cycles bike hire scheme to SE16.

Ms Alexander was speaking at a London Assembly transport committee meeting held to probe the decision to halt the Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf bridge project.

Under questioning from Florence Eshalomi AM about the risk that Southwark is losing out on a number of transport infrastructure schemes, Ms Alexander said: “We are making significant progress on walking and cycling investments in Southwark and this part of London.

“Work has already started on Cycleway 4 which goes from Tower Bridge to Greenwich – and that will be extended to Woolwich.

“We’re also working with Southwark on a new cycle route from Rotherhithe to Peckham.

“I’ve asked TfL officers to accelerate their work to expand the Santander scheme further into Southwark, so that when we get this fantastic new cycleway built from Tower Bridge to Greenwich, further along that route you can get Santander docked bikes, because I know that is an aspiration that Southwark has.”

Southwark Council leader Peter John said last week: “We are also working with TfL on a programme to expand the Santander cycle hire scheme from London Bridge to the [Rotherhithe] peninsular, and this will be part of the cycle hire action plan presented to cabinet in the autumn.”

Southwark Council has launched a public consultation on the ‘Rotherhithe Movement Plan’, a three-pronged set of proposed changes to transport in the area.

The council is proposing to introduce a Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks controlled parking zone (CPZ), replace the Lower Road one way system with two-way traffic and build a new cycle route along Redriff Road and Salter Road.

More details are available at www.southwark.gov.uk/rotherhithemovementplan and in the three consultation pages:

The closing date for responses is 4 October.

Southwark Council is to buy the former Red Lion Boys’ Club in Hawkstone Road with the aim of developing new council homes on the site.

The now defunct boys’ club occupied a building that was previously a church on a prominent site near Surrey Quays Station.

The council believes that around 150 new homes could be created in two-tower development if adajcent land already in council ownership is included in the scheme.

The purchase was approved at Southwark’s cabinet last week, with Cllr Leo Pollak telling colleagues that the site has “really significant potential” for new council housing.

Cllr Pollak wrote: The former Red Lion Boys Club site not only creates an opportunity for significant numbers of new council homes but also creates the opportunity for the re-provision and expansion of the community hall for the benefit of the estate TRA as well as the wider community, which we will required as part of any brief for the site.”

The council made a previous attempt to purchase the site in 2015 but its £2.5 million bid was not accepted.

According to the council’s report on the proposed purchase, the site’s registration as an asset of community value under Localism Act has lapsed.

Firms in and around The Blue have voted to continue their Business Improvement District (BID) for a second term of five years.

The BID’s new mandate – that begins on 1 October – is based on the 2019 – 2024 Renewal Proposal.

Of 140 eligible businesses, 90 voted in favour of renewing the BID.

BIDs are funded by a levy on business rates which is then used for schemes to make the area a better place to trade.

Proposals to extend the historic China Hall pub in Lower Road to incorporate four flats have been vetoed by Southwark planning officers.

Owners Hamna Wakaf Ltd applied to Southwark Council to add side extensions and a mansard roof to the existing pub building.

In their decision notice, Southwark planners said: “The proposed development by virtue of its poor design, layout, scale and inappropriate materials would fail to respond positively to its surroundings.

“The inappropriate scale and design of the building would be an incongruous feature within the street scene which would adversely affect the character and appearance the surrounding area.”

The case officer’s report also noted that “the scheme does not provide sufficient mitigation measures to allow for the successful continued use of the pub”.

The China Hall has a 300-year history; learn more in this article by Andie Byrnes.

The pub is registered as an asset of community value (ACV) under the Localism Act.

Details of the planning application can be seen at 19/AP/0136

A graphic posted by Google to promote the launch of public transport ‘crowdedness predictions’ in Google Maps

Google is adding ‘crowdedness predictions’ for public transport on its Maps apps … and the company says that Canada Water is one of London’s most crowded stations and the Jubilee line is the most crowded line.

In a blog post Google explained: “Crowdedness predictions come from optional feedback directly from the people who use Google Maps. In fact, you may have received notifications asking about how crowded your subway, train, or bus ride was after navigating in transit mode. To learn more about how crowdedness levels vary around the world, we analyzed aggregated and anonymized reports of crowdedness from Google Maps users from October 2018 to June 2019 during peak commuting hours (6am – 10am), and identified which lines had the highest number of crowdedness reports. “

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan recently responded to concerns about the overcrowding at Canada Water, noting that the Elizabeth line could help free up capacity on the Jubilee line.

TfL is also bidding for Government funds to further upgrade the East London line – including a revamp for Surrey Quays Station – with a decision due in July.