Further sections of the partly-completed Cycleway 4 along Jamaica Road will be opened up for public use as part of plans by the Mayor and TfL to make it easier to walk and cycle when lockdown restrictions are eased.

The London Streetscape plan, announced on Wednesday, means that work on Cycleway 4 “will be accelerated with temporary measures so the Londoners can benefit from them more quickly,” according to City Hall.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “The capacity of our public transport will be dramatically reduced post-coronavirus as a result of the huge challenges we face around social distancing.

“Everyone who can work from home must continue to do so for some time to come. The emergency measures included in our major strategic London Streetspace programme will help those who have to travel to work by fast-tracking the transformation of streets across our city.

“Many Londoners have rediscovered the joys of walking and cycling during lockdown and, by quickly and cheaply widening pavements, creating temporary cycle lanes and closing roads to through traffic we will enable millions more people to change the way they get around our city.”

A short section of Cycleway 4 near Southwark Park opened in early March.

The Printworks has applied to Southwark Council to vary its premises licence to change the venue’s maximum capacity for live music and DJ-led events from 5,000 to 6,000.

The application is to amend condition 340 to read ‘That the full premises will trade to capacity (6,000 people), when a DJ and / or live music will perform / be performed, on no more than 20 events per year. These events are referred to as ‘major events'” and to amend condition 341 to read ‘That the maximum capacity of the premises is 6,000 persons for all DJ / music led nights and 6,000 patrons for all day time events and exhibitions.’

Details of the application can be found here and comments can be sent to Southwark Council until 11 May.

The current licence can be viewed here.

On Friday, volunteers and staff from Time & Talents delivered food to more than 120 local people who’d requested help.

Details of how to donate food will be announced soon, but in the meantime the charity would welcome contributions of strong ‘bags for life’ and cardboard boxes with handles.

These can be brought to the Old Mortuary in St Marychurch Street on Thursday.

https://twitter.com/Time_Talents/status/1256918789779795970

Data released this week by the Office for National Statistics shows that between 1 March and 17 April, around 30 residents of SE16 had died with COVID-19 mentioned on their death certificates.

The data uses Middle Super Output Areas (MSOAs), geographical designations used for census purposes.

The part of SE16 with the highest number of COVID-19 deaths is the eastern half of the Rotherhithe peninsula (dubbed ‘Surrey Quays’ by the House of Commons Library) where 13 deaths where COVID-19 was cited on the death certificate had been recorded in the six weeks starting on 1 March.

There are five MSOAs which together cover approximately the same area as the SE16 postcode:

  • Surrey Quays (Southwark 008) – 13 deaths
  • South Bermondsey East (Southwark 011) – 6 deaths
  • South Bermondsey Central (Southwark 010) – 5 deaths
  • Canada Water (Southwark 007) – 3 deaths
  • Rotherhithe (Southwark 001) – 2 deaths
  • Bermondsey East (Southwark 004) – 1 death

Local charity the Bede House Association is looking for a trustee to join its council with skills in construction and property management.

Bede has deep roots in Bermondsey and Rotherhithe and supports victims of domestic abuse, young people aged 8-19, individuals with learning disabilities and isolated seniors.

Find out about the voluntary role and how to apply here.

Canada Water developer British Land has contributed £20,000 to the Southwark Community Response Fund set up to help local organisations deal with the implications of the COVID-19 crisis.

British Land says that the extra cash will “provide additionality for charities, social enterprises, TRAs and community groups in Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks wards”.

More information and guidance on how to apply can be found on United St Saviour’s website.

In a post on the Canada Water Masterplan website, British Land also said: “To support Canada Water’s various local businesses, we have also released our smaller retail, food & beverage, charity and leisure customers from their rental obligations for three months (April to June).

“We hope this will go some way to supporting local businesses through this difficult time.”

Southwark Council’s director of regeneration has this week approved a deal that will see the redevelopment of the former Cherry Garden School site redesigned to take the proportion of council homes in the scheme from a third to half.

We reported in January 2019 that the proposed redevelopment would have 18 council homes out of 56 new flats to be constructed by Higgins Homes.

According to a council report: “Concerns were raised by members [ie councillors] of the need to maximise council retained social rented units on the site.

“This was due to the council’s new policy focus to provide 50% council rented units, where feasible and viable, to maximise council homes; this proposed change would address those concerns.

As a result of this week’s decision, the council will pay Higgins Homes £2.6 million in lieu of the sales revenue they would have received from the nine intermediate (shared ownership or similar) homes originally proposed.

The redesigned scheme will have 26 council homes and 30 homes for private sale.

Affordable housing is assessed on the basis of habitable rooms (bedrooms and living rooms) and on this calculation the private and council components of the scheme equate to 82 habitable rooms each.

A crowdfunding drive launched by a small business based at South Dock Marina has raised nearly £3,000 to make protective visors for frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Marine Canvas Hut has teamed up with a group of volunteers making high-quality, yet low-cost protective visors.

Further details of the project can be found on Facebook and GoFundMe.

Bermondsey’s Compass School has launched an appeal to raise £10,000 for its hardship fund to support disadvantaged pupils and their families during the school closure.

So far the school has raised more than £4,000 via JustGiving.

“This is a challenging time for our community and especially so for our disadvantaged pupils who lack the resources others take for granted,” says the school.

“Our school sits in a location with the highest level of deprivation nationally.

“The majority of our pupils either receive Free School Meals (FSM) or have met the criteria in the past 6 years (Pupil Premium).

“Whether its the lack of IT at home, access to books, or a good square meal, we want to ensure that disadvantage is not further entrenched during this period.”

The school would also welcome donations of laptop computers to be distributed to pupils so they can take advantage of online learning opportunities.

If you can help, email Mr May (Staff Governor) [email protected] for further information.