Historic England – the Government’s heritage watchdog – says that the tall buildings proposed in the Canada Water masterplan would have “a profound and far-reaching impact on the London skyline” and would harm the setting of two of the capital’s most famous landmarks.

Historic England’s Alasdair Young wrote: “… we have identified the impact of the development in views along the northern half of London Bridge towards the Grade I listed Tower Bridge as being particularly harmful.

“This is because the cluster of tall buildings, as accentuated by the 162m tower in Plot D would block the silhouette of Tower Bridge’s south bastion in kinetic views along London Bridge, visually competing with its monumental character and reducing its landmark status along the Thames.”

Historic England is also concerned about the impact on the protected view of St Paul’s Cathedral from Greenwich Park.

“We consider that the encroachment created by the tall buildings would cause harm to the landmark status of St Paul’s Cathedral,” wrote Mr Young.

He adds that the proposed tall buildings would also spoil the view of the spire of St Mary’s Church in Rotherhithe from Waterside Gardens in Wapping.

The watchdog acknowledges that the proposed tall buildings “largely” [their italics] accord with local planning policy.

Read Historic England’s comments in full here.

The townscape assessment documents referred to in the HE response are available on the planning file for the masterplan application.

 

 

 

A £1.3 million section of cycle route between Canada Water and the the Southwark/Lewisham boundary at South Dock has been approved by Southwark’s cabinet member for transport.

The scheme includes £500,000 for a new ‘rollout’ bridge across the lock at South Dock and £115,000 to widen a bridge over the Albion Channel.

This scheme is part of the much larger Quietway 14 route which stretches from Blackfriars Road in the west to the Thames Barrier and beyond in the east.

Further details are available in these documents on the Southwark website.

 

On Wednesday a Transport for London committee will consider a report on the proposed walking and cycling bridge across the Thames between Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf.

You can read the committee report here.

“The Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf crossing will provide a much needed new cross-river walking and cycling connection between the two key areas of London; Rotherhithe in my constituency and Canary Wharf, which between them are expected to accommodate over 36,000 new homes and 112,000 new jobs by 2030. That is a huge number and better connections are urgently needed to match growth,” said Florence Eshalomi, London Assembly member for Lambeth and Southwark.

“The next stages will see TfL considering further options for landing points, opening and operating mechanisms, height and access arrangements. I am very pleased that TfL are determined to ensure that the development process for this scheme is transparent and robust, building on the lessons learnt from the Garden Bridge. The public will be able to feedback again during the second public consultation in the summer and I look forward to seeing further responses to this fantastic project.

“The new crossing will provide my constituents with a safe, attractive and direct route to Canary Wharf, reducing journey times and encouraging healthier travel in line with the vision set out by the Mayor in his draft Transport Strategy.”

Transport for London has launched a public consultation on plans for a bridge for pedestrians and cyclists across the Thames from Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf.

Two possible landing points on the Rotherhithe side have been presented: Nelson Dock and Durand’s Wharf.

TfL says: “Based on the studies that we have carried out so far, we propose a navigable bridge as our preferred option for a river crossing between Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf. Whilst there is a strong case for providing a river crossing, we do not wish to prevent the continued use of the River Thames for the transport of people and goods.”

Val Shawcross, Deputy Mayor for Transport, said: “It’s great news that we’ve started the formal process for a new walking and cycling crossing between Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf. This area of east London has seen huge growth in recent years, and our desire for a dedicated crossing for cyclists and pedestrians shows our real commitment to greener forms of transport across London.

“It will provide vital new connections to work, shopping and leisure facilities for thousands of local residents and provide a new route for commuters into Canary Wharf. We now want everyone to have their say before we outline further details of how we can make this ambition a reality.”

Full details of the consultation – which runs till 8 January 2018 – can be found here.

TfL is holding public exhibitions in SE16 on Saturday 18 November and Thursday 23 November.

 

Transport for London has recently circulated this letter:

I am writing to inform you that for five nights a week from 13 November to 8 December, a series of temporary closures of Rotherhithe Tunnel are planned.

This is so we can carry out essential investigation works and test safety systems in the tunnel.

These investigation works will inform future refurbishment works.
We are working overnight to help minimise any inconvenience that may be caused.

How the works may affect you

We plan to close the tunnel, between 22:00 – 05:00, during the following nights:

  • Monday 13 November – Friday 17 November
  • Monday 20 November – Friday 24 November
  • Monday 27 November – Friday 1 December
  • Monday 4 December – Friday 8 December

    The tunnel will re-open at 05:00 each morning following the investigation works.

    Temporary traffic diversions, via Tower Bridge, will be signed but please plan ahead, allow more time and use alternative routes where possible.

    Please note that while every effort will be made to complete the works as planned, poor weather or unforeseen conditions may result in the works, and associated tunnel closures, being rescheduled at short notice.

    Visit tfl.gov.uk/trafficnews or follow @TfLTrafficNews on Twitter for live road travel updates.

Cyclists and pedestrians

There will be no pedestrian or cyclist access during the investigation works due to safety precautions. Please follow signed diversion routes.

Find out more

In addition, we plan to carry out investigation works in the Blackwall Tunnel in December 2017 and January 2018. These investigation works will also require temporary overnight closures. Travel advice can be found at tfl.gov.uk/traffic/status

We apologise in advance for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience while we complete these essential investigative works.

Should you have any questions or concerns about the works, please contact us using the details at the top of this letter.

Yours faithfully

Nick Fairholme

Director, Project & Programme Delivery – Surface Transport Transport for London

Transport for London has not yet ruled out a tunnel or an enhanced ferry service between Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf as an alternative to the proposed walking and cycling bridge.

TfL is pressing ahead with plans for a bridge, but says that next month’s public consultation on the scheme will also feature tunnel and boat options.

A report [PDF] on the proposed Rotherhithe crossing was considered by TfL’s programmes and investment committee last Friday.

Based on the work that has been done to date, TfL has provisionally
recommended that a navigable bridge should be investigated in greater detail, with the initial options assessment concluding:

(a) an enhanced ferry would be the lowest cost option and could be delivered
more quickly. It provides a positive Benefit: Cost Ratio (BCR) but, unlike a
fixed link crossing, it is unlikely to deliver a step-change in walking and
cycling accessibility, or realise significant wider economic benefits;

(b) a navigable bridge has a broadly comparable BCR to an enhanced ferry,
however, it would realise greater total benefits by providing a permanent link
to facilitate a transformational change in accessibility. This aligns more
strongly with developing policy and the scheme’s strategic objectives and,
further, a permanent link has the potential to realise significant wider
economic benefits which have not been quantified in the BCR at this stage. A
bridge has strong support amongst cycling groups, accessibility groups and
other stakeholders, particularly on the south side of the river, but concerns
remain over the need to open for shipping and the impact on residents in the
immediate vicinity; and

(c) a tunnel would offer similar benefits to a bridge and provide a more reliable transport connection, as it would not need to open for shipping. It would have lesser visual impact than a bridge, however, it may be seen as a less attractive environment for users and is forecast to cost significantly more, resulting in a lower BCR.

The report adds:

Work is now underway to investigate navigable bridge options in further detail and, as more information becomes available, the provisional selection will be refined and tested alongside the other options before a final decision is made on the solution for a new crossing.

Whilst the further investigations continue, it will be important not to dismiss other options until they have been considered as part of a public consultation.

Remarks by former TfL boss Sir Peter Hendy – commenting on the “pretty weak business case” for the Rotherhithe bridge – were recently made public as part of the evidence presented to Margaret Hodge’s review of the Garden Bridge.

At last week’s GLA Oversight Committee current TfL commissioner Mike Brown disassociated himself from his predecessor’s comments on the Rotherhithe scheme.

IF

Thames Clippers has warned passengers to expect disruption to the ferry service between Nelson Dock at Rotherhithe and Canary Wharf next week due to lower than usual tides.

In an email to customers, the ferry operator said:

Please be advised that low tidal conditions are predicted 21st August – 25th August which may cause disruption to the RB4 Doubletree Docklands Ferry service at the following times:

 

  • 21st August 2017: 2040-2200
  • 22nd August 2017: 2131-2251
  • 23rd August 2017: 2216-2336
  • 24th August 2017: 1020-1140 and 2250-0010
  • 25th August 2017: 2330-0050

 

We’re sorry for the inconvenience caused.