Historic England – the Government’s heritage watchdog – says that the tall buildings proposed in the Canada Water masterplan would have “a profound and far-reaching impact on the London skyline” and would harm the setting of two of the capital’s most famous landmarks.

Historic England’s Alasdair Young wrote: “… we have identified the impact of the development in views along the northern half of London Bridge towards the Grade I listed Tower Bridge as being particularly harmful.

“This is because the cluster of tall buildings, as accentuated by the 162m tower in Plot D would block the silhouette of Tower Bridge’s south bastion in kinetic views along London Bridge, visually competing with its monumental character and reducing its landmark status along the Thames.”

Historic England is also concerned about the impact on the protected view of St Paul’s Cathedral from Greenwich Park.

“We consider that the encroachment created by the tall buildings would cause harm to the landmark status of St Paul’s Cathedral,” wrote Mr Young.

He adds that the proposed tall buildings would also spoil the view of the spire of St Mary’s Church in Rotherhithe from Waterside Gardens in Wapping.

The watchdog acknowledges that the proposed tall buildings “largely” [their italics] accord with local planning policy.

Read Historic England’s comments in full here.

The townscape assessment documents referred to in the HE response are available on the planning file for the masterplan application.

 

Transport for London has submitted its initial comments on the implications of British Land’s massive Canada Water masterplan for local roads and railways.

A few key points from the 13-page letter:

  • The Elizabeth line will provide some relief (in the short to medium term) on the Jubilee line.
  • The proposed Bakerloo line extension to Lewisham, proposed to be operational in the late 2020s, is expected to relieve London Overground services north of New Cross Gate, and reduce the interchange demand at Canada Water station.
  • TfL hopes to be able to raise frequencies on the East London line from 16 trains per hour at present to 20 trains per hour.
  • Surrey Quays Station will need upgrading/expanding to cope with extra passengers from the new development – potentially with a new entrance
  • “TfL would support provision of Santander Cycles cycle hire docking stations in the masterplan area, as well as off-site, to help ‘link’ to the current central London zone at London Bridge, acknowledging that further contributions from other developments in Canada Water and Bermondsey will be required to do this.”
  • The design of Redriff Road will need to take into account the proposed Peckham- Rotherhithe cycle route

You can read TfL’s letter here and see all the Canada Water masterplan application documents at 18/AP/1615.

GoodPeople are working with architects Allies and Morrison to recruit two paid work placements to join the practice for two weeks starting on 10 September 2018.

These opportunities will provide valuable experience in Business Support functions such as HR, Finance, IT and Facilities. The work placements are available to people between the ages of 18 and 65 who live in the Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks areas and are currently unemployed or economically inactive.

Full details her: Allies and Morrison Sep 18 Work Placements – Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks.

Hundreds of homes, shops, hotels, offices, a nightclub, a cinema, student accommodation, hotel, health, education … there’s a lot to get to grips with in the new Canada Water Masterplan planning application.

As we’ve previously noted, the paperwork runs to more than 200 documents.

To help local residents take advantage of their opportunity to respond to the planning application, Southwark CAN and Southwark Law Centre have drawn up this useful guide.

British Land themselves are also running drop-in sessions where you can view the documents.

And the next Canada Water Consultative Forum is another opportunity to get up to speed with the project.

These new images show how Canada Water could look if British Land’s major planning application gets the go-ahead.

 

British Land has entered into a Master Development Agreement with Southwark Council and submitted an outline planning application for the Canada Water Masterplan.

The outline submission also includes a detailed planning application for the project’s first three buildings, which include workspace, homes (of which 35 per cent will be affordable), retail and a new leisure centre. The first three buildings are located on parts of the site which are currently overflow car parks for Surrey Quays Shopping Centre alongside the edge of Canada Water itself, as well as the vacant site at Robert’s Close.

Subject to planning approvals, construction of the first aspects of the masterplan could begin in spring 2019.

The Master Development Agreement provides a framework for delivery of the Masterplan, pools Southwark Council and British Land’s freehold and leasehold interests across the site and allows a new 500-year lease to be drawn down.

This agreement also confirms the local authority’s stake in the project, and their right to invest up to 20% in each forthcoming plot; the agreement also confirms the location of a new leisure centre as part of the proposals.

Roger Madelin, Head of Canada Water Development, British Land, said: “We are delighted to have entered into a Master Development Agreement with Southwark Council and submitted our planning application for the Canada Water Masterplan which marks an important milestone in the delivery of this project.

“Drawing on our experience of creating vibrant, mixed-use places across the capital, this major urban centre at Canada Water will provide an exciting place to live, work and visit, delivering high quality design, active spaces and significant economic and social benefits for the local community.

“We have worked closely with Southwark Council and the local residents of Canada Water to achieve this important first step, and will continue to work with them to enable a truly cultural and diverse neighbourhood for London.”

Cllr Peter John, leader of Southwark Council, said: “It is fantastic to see this project moving forward. British Land have done great work to consult and engage with local people and the resulting Masterplan will deliver what local people want to see, including a guaranteed 35 per cent affordable housing split 70 per cent social rent and 30 per cent shared ownership in the first phase, new retail spaces and job opportunities, education and health facilities and a brand new leisure centre.

“In addition British Land, in conjunction with the council, has committed to a Social Regeneration Charter which will ensure that the lives of existing local residents will be improved by the project which we believe to be a first for a project such as this.

“People will be able to see the proposals and make further comments through the planning procedure, so there is still time to get involved and help create the future of Canada Water.”

The planning application has not yet been ‘validated’ by Southwark Council and the documents should be available on the council’s website in the next few weeks.

This week Southwark Council agreed to move forward with its development agreement with British Land for the Canada Water development, including the sites of Surrey Quays Shopping Centre, the former Harmsworth Quays printworks, the Mast Leisure Park, the old dock offices and the former Rotherhithe Police Station.

Listen to the audio of Tuesday’s cabinet item on this page, and read all the reports here.

Canada Water

Southwark Council is to make a formal decision on its development agreement with British Land at Canada Water before the local elections.

Giving formal notice that the decision will be rescheduled for Southwark’s cabinet meeting on Tuesday 13 March, the council says:

It is likely that it would not be appropriate for this decision to be taken during the pre-election period and would therefore need to be taken in May at the earliest.

It would however not be in the council’s commercial interest to delay the decision until then. The council’s potential partner is incurring significant cost in progressing the project.

Further delay will increase costs and project risk, which is likely to encourage them to renegotiate terms.

A decision is therefore sought at the earliest opportunity.

The decision relates to the council’s interest as landowner of some of the land at Canada Water to be redevelopment under the masterplan drawn up by British Land and is separate from the decision-making process on future planning applications.