The Government has issued a five-year certificate of immunity which prevents the Printworks (formerly Harmsworth Quays) at Canada Water from gaining listed status.

However, the building’s temporary uses have proved so popular that the building may not be flattened in the forthcoming redevelopment of Canada Water. Listen to this Estates Gazette podcast to find out more.

Donald Hunter – who served as radio officer on three Norwegian merchant ships carrying dangerous cargoes to allied forces – at the memorial outside the Norwegian Church

Three war memorials in Rotherhithe have been given listed status by the Government this week in the run up to Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday.

The three newly listed memorials are:

 

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St James’s Church in Bermondsey has been added to Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ register.

The entry on the register says:

“St James’s church was designed in the neoclassical style by James Savage and completed in 1829. The body of the church is in stock brick while the portico, spire and window dressings are in Bath stone. The plan is rectangular. The aisles were closed off in 1965 for rented income to save the church from closure. The nave roof was recently repaired but the masonry is in poor condition with rusted cramps, cracks and eroded stonework. The church has applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund for a grant to repair the external masonry.”

St James’s – which is a grade II* listed building – recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of its reopening and renewal.

A report on last month’s Ada Salter Day events by Graham Taylor:
The Ada Salter Day was a great success – from Friday evening to Saturday evening we’ve calculated there were about 400 people in attendance to celebrate Ada’s 150th birthday .
1) On Friday evening there was a performance of Red Flag over Bermondsey by the Quaker actress and playwright, Lynn Morris;
2) On Saturday morning an exhibition of 71 photos and documents relating to Ada’s life was opened by the Mayors of Southwark and Raunds, with representatives of several Quaker Meetings in attendance, along with a delegation from Raunds, Northamptonshire, Ada’s home town;
3) There was then a tour for guests led by the Rotherhithe and Bermondsey History Society of the Ada Salter Garden and the Ada Salter cottages;
4) At 2 pm came the flower-laying ceremony at Ada’s statue on the riverside near Cherry Garden Pier. About 100 people attended this part of the day. Speakers were Lorna Greene of GMB Sisters (trade unionists); Peter Tatchell (talking about Ada and human rights); Juliet Prager (Quakers in Britain, explaining the Quaker values Ada had); and Peter John (Leader of Southwark Council). Flowers were laid by the Quaker Socialists, by the Raunds Historical Society, by the Raunds Labour Party, and by the Mayors of Rands and Southwark. Sheila Hancock arrived for the ceremony but did not speak. The Quaker actresses, Sheila Hancock and Judi Dench, had been great supporters of the campaign to erect a statue to Ada in 2012-14;
5) At 3 pm there was a second performance of Lynn Morris’s play, again attended by about 80 people and once again receiving a standing ovation. This time there was also a Q & A session at the end, led by David Morris and Graham Taylor;
6) Finally, in St Peter’s church (Catholic) there was a beautiful homage to Ada by the Bermondsey and Rotherhithe Choral Society. Devised by Sue Heath-Downey, this concert presented Ada’s favourite music (she was a singer), starting with American Spirituals. Ada used to play them on the piano at Peckham Meeting after the Sunday silence and “bring the house down”. These particular versions were set by Michael Tippett, who had a connection with Ada. The finale was the rousing anthem, Zadok the Priest, by Handel, Ada’s favourite composer.
* Graham Taylor is the author of Ada Salter: Pioneer of Ethical Socialism.

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Today is the 75th anniversary of the World War II bombing of Millstream House in Jamaica Road.

By looking at the brickwork, you can see where the building has been patched up.

Curiously, when the building was restored in 1947, a gargoyle recovered from the debris of air raid damage at the Palace of Westminster was included in the works.

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Earlier this week Corbett’s Wharf on Bermondsey Wall East was declared to be part of a conservation area.

By coincidence, the owners of the Thames News (ITV regional news) archive have just published this report from November 1982 of a protest at Corbett’s Wharf by Peter Tatchell – then Bermondsey Labour’s prospective parliamentary candidate – against the London Docklands Development Corporation (LDDC).

Well worth a watch.